Posts Tagged ‘dose’

Chicken pox : spot-on survival tips!

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Most children will get chicken pox at some stage, and it can be a nightmare! It’s horrible to see your little one covered in spots, but there are a few things you can do, as a parent, to relieve some of the symptoms- both over-the-counter remedies, and some that are a little more unusual, but have been recommended to me or that I used when Chiglet had chicken pox.

Basically, you are loking at paracetemol to help the fever, and lotions to help the itching, but I have a couple of other very effective suggestions to help ease the itch!:-

Over-the-counter medicines:-

Chicken pox survival tip 1- a Get Well Wheel

Chicken pox survival tip 1- a Get Well Wheel

Poxclin Coolmousse- this is good if you have a large area of spots to treat, and as it’s a mousse is quite light on the skin- avoiding that ‘crispy pink crust’ type sensation that parents who were treated with lotions and potions in the 1970’s and 1980’s will be familiar with!

ViraSoothe – available as a cooling gel that can be applied two to three times a day for babies from 6 months onwards.

Eurax is great, but for children under 3 it suggests consulting your Doctor before applying.

Calamine lotion (basically calamine and zinc oxide) is the traditional remedy,  once smelt never forgotten!

A couple of alternatives are:-

Oat baths. Fill the end of a pair of tights (a sock or a muslin works, too) with oats (just normal porridge oats), and tie the open end with string or in a knot. Run the water through it, so the bath water turns cloudy. You can also use the sock as a sponge and dab on your childs spots. 

Bicarbonate of soda in bath- this is what really worked for my daughter when she had chicken pox! Instant relief from the itching for the poor little mite 🙂

It may also be useful to clothe your little one in a loose fitting Onesie so they can’t scratch the spots, and keeping fingernails cut short may also help prevent scratching!

Keep track of baby's medicine times, set the 'clock' dial to show when baby is given calpol etc.

Keep track of baby’s medicine times, set the ‘clock’ dial to show when baby is given calpol etc.

Chicken pox is often accompanied by a fever, in which case paracetamol or ibuprofen can help.

Don’t forget your  Baby Medicine Wheel or Get Well Wheel to keep a note of the time you gave the medicine to your child, and you’ll know the time that you can safely give the next dose.

If your child is at school or nursery, let them know that your child is ill in case other children are at risk, and it’s also important to note that people with chicken pox should not travel by air until all the spots have crusted over.

 

 

 

 

chicken pox survival tips

Aaachooo!

Friday, November 9th, 2012

It’s that time of year again- you’ve got flu, you’re a bit feverish, yet  have to take your flu remedy tablets every 4 hours. It’s a nightmare to remember what time you took them and when you can safely dose yourself up with the next lot!

This is where the Get Well Wheel is a godsend:-

Take tablets (lots of water!)

Set the numbers on the dial to show the time your flu medicine was taken

Pop your Get Well Wheel on the mantelpiece or bedside table.

Easy!

Each card is supplied with an envelope, so you can write a little get well soon message on the back and post it as a card or pressie to someone who’s feeling under the weather.

There are 3 embellishments to choose from, a red hot water bottle, pretty pink hottie-bottle or orange flower with green leaf design. Available for just £4.20 (free delivery!) from the Chiggs shop. It’s brilliant to add to a get well soon hamper and as with all Chiggs Wheels available at wholesale prices. Fill in our trade enquiry form for a trade price and information.

‘Right dose, right time’ – changes to Paracetamol dose guidelines for babies and children

Monday, November 21st, 2011

Children’s medicines are in the news again today, as a report on the Telegraph website says that parents should be cutting down on the doses of Paracetamol, such as Calpol, they give young children.

Until recently guidelines on bottles of childrens medicines suggested the same dose for children aged from 12 months to six years. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has now revised these recommendations, saying that with the “very wide age bands …younger children may have received a dose of paracetamol that was higher than necessary”.

The MHRA suggested that dosing be split into tighter age bands, reflecting the differences in weight and bodily development between a one-year-old baby and a six-year-old child, and given new recommended doses for children aged between 2 and 4. Doses have also been altered for babies, and the new guidelines have been incorporated on product packaging.

Chiggs recommends that for real peace of mind, parents also make sure they have a Baby Medicine Wheel or a Get Well Wheel close at hand. When the medicine is given (in the correct new dose of course!) parents can turn the dial to make a note of the time, and that way they can give the right dose of medicine, at the right time!

 

Musings on Medicine

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

I read in The Times newspaper this morning that parents are being warned not to give childen medicine with a teaspoon. This follows a study published in the International Journal of Clinical Practice that found that teaspoons can hold anything between 2.5ml and 7.3ml of medicine. As recommended doses are usually 1 or 2 lots of 5ml (depending on the medicine and the age of the child), using any old teaspoon from the cutlery drawer could put children at risk of an overdose. So it’s being recommended that parent make sure they use the 5ml measuring spoons usually provided, or a measuring syringe.

Children’s medicines such as Calpol, etc, also have a recommended time to wait between doses, usually 4 hours, and you have to adhere to these times, again to avoid overdosing. Which is why I designed the Baby Medicine Wheel (and Get Well Wheel for older children). You just rotate the numbered dial to the time the medicine is given, and you’ll know when the next dose can safely be administered.

If you’re looking after a poorly child (my sympathies, I’ve been there!) and would like the peace of mind a Baby Medicine Wheel (or Get Well Wheel) can give, they are available for a mere £3.99 (UK Postage and Packing is included in that price) from the Chiggs online shop or from some of our many stockists.

Only slightly off topic, I remember the first time I gave Holly medicine using a syringe. I didn’t realise how powerfully they can squirt, so I popped it into her mouth, firmly pushed the plunger, and wondered why she had a bit of a shocked look on her little face. I assummed it was something to do with her first taste of medicine- it was only when I was washing the syringe and saw the power of the jet of water squirt out that I realised why Holly had looked so startled!